Author Archives: oldmanuscripts

30 Rods dug this week

How long is a rod? Again working on transcription of the account books for the building of a stately home I find myself wondering how much digging Francis, William and Thomas have been doing this week, as it is measured … Continue reading

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The Stately Homes of England

We are currently working on transcribing account books associated with the building of a stately home in the 17th century.  This amazing resource gives week by week expenditure, detailing everything that was needed, including labour, for the building of a … Continue reading

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For a Rinlett of Clarett wyne….

In a previous post (How many kilderkins in a hogshead) it states: “The standardised measurements continued to be the subject of later statutes.  In 1423 an Act of Parliament first standardised the hogshead, though the volume varied by locality and … Continue reading

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The old and the new

Although I had started a blog about things historical, I seem to have lost access to it.  So rather than waste the posts, which I think are interesting, I have reposted them into this new blog.  I hope you enjoy … Continue reading

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Fame, and fortune ?

It’s always nice when a client is pleased with our work at Transcription Services Ltd, and even more pleasing when they tell other people about us. Last month I was contacted by Atlas Obscura telling me that someone mentioned the … Continue reading

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Bad and dubious debts – 2nd May 2017

Frequently inventories, particularly those of merchants, have lists of those owing money to the deceased. These are sometimes divided into ‘sperate’ and ‘desperate’ debts. Prior to transcribing these inventories I had never come across the word ‘sperate’, but once seen … Continue reading

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Burnt china – 2nd April 2017

Another 18th century inventory that came my way recently made mention of “Six Burnt China Plates, One Burnt China Tea Pott” This was a term I hadn’t come across before, and puzzled me.  To burn a plate might be careless, … Continue reading

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